Food Glorious Food

Episode 3 May 08, 2020 00:10:00
Food Glorious Food
London by Lockdown
Food Glorious Food
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Show Notes

In this episode your intrepid lockdown travellers tackle the big food questions.

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What are Romanesco broccoli and celeriac and what do you do with them?
What’s the great “jollof rice controversy”?
How hot is too hot for a vindaloo?
Shouldn’t we all eat cheese scones every day?
Are vegetarian Scotch eggs worth it?

Thanks
Opening & Closing Credits by Unregistered Master Builder
Touching Moments by Ketsa (Free Music Archive)
Markus J Buehler Viral Counterpoint of the Coronavirus Spike Protein (2019-nCoV)
BBC SFX Archive

Information & Websites
UK Landworkers Alliance.

For the ‘World Famous London by Lockdown Cook Off’ Recipes
Vegetarian Vindaloo
Cheese Scones
Jollof Rice (it’s so good we included two links): here and here
Vegetarian Scotch Eggs

Contact
Facebook: @CraigsAudioWorks 
Twitter & Instagram: @LDNbylockdown
Available linktr.ee/LondonbyLockdown

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