Covid Dreams

Episode 5 May 27, 2020 00:11:39
Covid Dreams
London by Lockdown
Covid Dreams

May 27 2020 | 00:11:39

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Show Notes

In this episode we turn our attention to those everyday sounds we often overlook: the creaks, the squeaks, the buzzes and the pops that we build our daily soundtracks around without necessarily noticing.

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Whenever travelling in a new place it’s easy for our attention to be hijacked by the grandiose: the British Museum, Tower of London, Big Ben, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge. End to end, our flat is a modest 32 footsteps. At first, when we paused to listen closer, all we heard were random, almost opaque, individual noises, but as we refocussed our attention — maybe as we plodded into lockdown, maybe as we fell into restlessness and insomnia, maybe as the world we knew ground to a stop — patterns of composition, harmony and story took shape. And it was the familiarity of these stories that comforted me, despite having never listened to them before. I found a grounded counterpoint in an emerging world that isn’t mine (or yours, for that matter — it is too much to say here it’s now the virus’s). For me, lockdown is like sleepwalking though a restless Dream-Wake hybrid world punctuated by fatigue, insomnia and curious dreams that, dull at their edges and obtuse and fractured, create No Time. And I’m not alone, lockdown has spawned a world-wide epidemic of weird, mysterious and self-contradictory dreams.

In this soundscape, we explore, and in part decipher, the mental and physical landscapes of London during lockdown. Through the intricacies and half-spaces of a recurring dream about leaving a house — any house, my house, your house — we attempt to uncover the overlooked stories of our homes.

Thanks
Opening & Closing Credits by Unregistered Master Builder
Background music, Markus J Buehler Viral Counterpoint of the Coronavirus Spike Protein (2019-nCoV)
Justin Mullins for SFX
BBC SFX Archives
London Improvisers Orchestra (LIO Bandcamp page)
Facebook:@londonimprovisersorchestra
Sound Design at Greenwich blog
Facebook:@SoundGreenwich

Articles
Coronavirus has created an epidemic of weird dreams
Why is Ryanair taking to the skies when there’s nowhere to fly?
Transition Events (excerpt from my novel set in a hybrid Sleep­–Wake world where nothing is as it seems)

Contact
Facebook: @CraigsAudioWorks 
Twitter & Instagram: @LDNbylockdown
Available linktr.ee/LondonbyLockdown

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